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SZ
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Registered: Apr 2001
Location: New York
Posts: 492

who writes use cases?

Is this question clear?

7) Which of the following MUST be present to write use cases?

a) Development team

b) Object technology expert

c) Domain expert

d) Requirements decision maker

Multiple Select - Please select all of the correct answers (this question has 2 correct choices).

It would seem that c) and d) are the correct answers. However, could you build an argument that an object technology expert should be present?

In Larman's process the use cases are used to discover the classes and some of their attributes and associations in the analysis phase. This is done through underlining the nouns in the use cases. Wouldn't it make sense to have an object technologist help produce clear use cases that would lend themselves to this subsequent phase? This would point to b) instead of d).

Also, from my experience, business analysts could scarcely be bothered with such tedious, mundane work as producing formalized use cases. They will write a word document but anything which seems like it would eventually become code is foreign to them. Thus, it is likely that writing use cases would fall to the object technology experts working together with a domain expert.

Nevertheless, the clue in this question is the word "MUST" in caps. This seems to point to c) and d).

What do you think?

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Old Post 07-11-2001 03:56 AM
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shreedev
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Registered: May 2001
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Posts: 24

Thumbs up Usecases -- team

I often answered same as mentioned. The reason

1) Usecases always(mostly) used to capture requirements and the functions. --- requirement decision maker needed.
2) The most important and critical requirements are from business processes. -- domain expert needed.
3) The word "MUST" implies the minimum needed members.

Thanks and Regards

__________________
sridhar

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Old Post 07-11-2001 12:25 PM
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scottho
Junior Member

Registered: Aug 2001
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 2

Re: who writes use cases?

quote:
Originally posted by SZ
Is this question clear?

7) Which of the following MUST be present to write use cases?

a) Development team

b) Object technology expert

c) Domain expert

d) Requirements decision maker

... from my experience, business analysts could scarcely be bothered with such tedious, mundane work as producing formalized use cases. They will write a word document but anything which seems like it would eventually become code is foreign to them. Thus, it is likely that writing use cases would fall to the object technology experts working together with a domain expert.

Nevertheless, the clue in this question is the word "MUST" in caps. This seems to point to c) and d).

What do you think?



IMHO, this question is vague in that these roles didn't give a definition of what their responsiblities are. Development team? Can't all others also be on the team? Or does that mean a group of programmers?

For many business information systems, you can have business analyst/domain experts, application developers, COTS component developers. But object technology expert? Do they mean someone who developed the kernal for Oracle, MFC, etc. or someone who use applies object technology to solve their problems?? What about your customer from say a high-tech industry like areospace? If your customer has a much higher knowledge level than the developers in his domain or industry, obviously either the customer or the domain expert they hire are the best qualified people to determine the business and application requirements. So the question is "who is a better contributor or source of knowledge?"

Don't let UML or job title draw the border for your knowledge. It really depends on one's training and experience. I'm well versed in both business areas (software goods manufacturing and international trade) and various design methods, both O-O and non O-O (e.g. IDEF0 and SA/SD) and I notice how much UML use case often fails to capture. I consider myself both a domain expert and a developer who can model and code. So your assumption of business analyst lacking that kind of technical savvy may be objectionable. Though I think this is a very BAD question, I too would choose c and d.

Scott

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Old Post 08-06-2001 12:38 AM
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ESY
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Is it neccessary to have the requirements decision maker. The use cases can be drawn from the requirements already specified.

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Old Post 08-23-2001 05:54 PM
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scottho
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Registered: Aug 2001
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 2

quote:
Originally posted by ESY
Is it neccessary to have the requirements decision maker. The use cases can be drawn from the requirements already specified.


You are also right. But I would guess the problem assumes the project is the new development, NOT reuse-based development where old artifacts (e.g. Use Case model or other domain models) can be reused.

Scott

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Old Post 08-24-2001 03:10 AM
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shreedev
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Registered: May 2001
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Usecases -- team

Dear All,
The correct answer is b) and c)
In my previous posting I have mentioned c) and d) later I found it is wrong because.
The requirement decsion maker is the user. He may not be in the team while writing a usecase. The post by ESY is make sense.
so the next options is object tech. expert.

Thanks and Regards

__________________
sridhar

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Old Post 08-24-2001 05:39 AM
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pfexa
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Registered: Aug 2001
Location: Berlin / Germany
Posts: 16

I also believe in
B OO expert
and
C domain expert

C knows what he wants (hopefully)
and B tries to understand it.

I can see a need neither for some decision maker
nor for the whole team

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Old Post 08-29-2001 01:32 PM
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ram
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Registered: Oct 2001
Location:
Posts: 9

Re: Usecases -- team

quote:
Originally posted by shreedev
Dear All,
The correct answer is b) and c)
In my previous posting I have mentioned c) and d) later I found it is wrong because.
The requirement decsion maker is the user. He may not be in the team while writing a usecase. The post by ESY is make sense.
so the next options is object tech. expert.

Thanks and Regards




The correct answer is c and d.
At the time of capturing requirements / required functionality ( writing use cases) , for all you know , you many not now what techonology / what methodology you will opt for to realize the requirements. Then why do you need a "Object technology expert".

And also I believe requirement decision maker is NOT user.
Do you mean a bank will ask all its customers to "DECISION MAKE".. what they want an ATM to do for them?..
At the most users/potentials users are interviewed and inputs are gathered. But DECISION MAKING is done by Bank.

The "Requirements decision maker" is required beacuse of some one is needed to call shots.
Again , taking the bank ATM example, requirements many vary from as simple as "User can with draw money" to as weird as " User after withdrwaing money can login to his/her personl page on yahoo and update his/her account information , if he/she feels so"

Here comes "Requirements decision maker" to call what is required and what is NOT.
Also, depending on fiscal and time resources one may be having, one can either drop / postpone a few GENUINE requirements.


However , if you think use cases are written from BASELINED requirement specification artifact , Requirements decision maker may not be required ( as he/she has already done the job).

But that should not be criteria to bring "Object technology expert" in. Is n't it?

Thanks and Regards
Ram

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Old Post 10-31-2001 05:23 AM
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ESY
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Registered: Aug 2001
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I passed the test about a month ago (77%).

I have not even programmed in OO stuff for more than a year, never mind OOAD.
My first intro to OOAD was 3 months ago. Reading the Fowler book again and again was the best preparation. Also I read the Larman book once for more detail, but the Fowler is the one to know.
Some other facts: I never got more than 70% on the sample test.
I found the sample one much more vague. I am of average intelligence!

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Old Post 10-31-2001 12:51 PM
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ram
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Registered: Oct 2001
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Question

quote:
Originally posted by ESY
I passed the test about a month ago (77%).

I have not even programmed in OO stuff for more than a year, never mind OOAD.
My first intro to OOAD was 3 months ago. Reading the Fowler book again and again was the best preparation. Also I read the Larman book once for more detail, but the Fowler is the one to know.
Some other facts: I never got more than 70% on the sample test.
I found the sample one much more vague. I am of average intelligence!



Hi..,
First of all , Congratulations.
Is the title of the Fowler book you were referrig to "UML Distilled"??

Also I would like to know the title of Larman's book.

Thanks and Regards
Ram

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Old Post 10-31-2001 01:35 PM
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Stephen Hosking
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Registered: Nov 2001
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Posts: 54

Another vague one

Which of OO Expert and Requirements Decision Maker MUST be present? The people who write the Use cases must know a quite a bit about Use Cases - the notation and goals, but they don't need to be Use Case experts, and certainly don't need to be OO Experts. But someone MUST decide what requirements will be included in use cases, and what will be omitted. Even if we only have an OO Expert and a Domain Expert, they MUST have some mechanism for arbitrating requirements. Thus one or other, or both of them, will be the Decision Maker.

(c) and (d). As sure as I can be.

But, as with a number of these, I don't know whether the subtlety is intended by tester, or whether there is an obvious answer in his or her mind, which in this case may be (b) and (c).

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Old Post 11-24-2001 11:12 PM
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Stephen Hosking
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Registered: Nov 2001
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Definitely (c) and (d)

I just did the sample test and got 100% for Requirements Modelling and 100% for Process, and this question must be one of those.

(Which restores my faith in the questioner. This is a good question, and the subtleties are probably intentional)

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Old Post 11-25-2001 02:23 AM
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ESY
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Registered: Aug 2001
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RAM

Sorry I did'nt reply earlier.
Yes Fowler book is 'UML Distilled'.
I don't have it in front of me now but the title of the Larman book is something like UML and Patterns, with a picture of a sailboat on the front.
I first read the UML Distilled once, then to get a full understanding of all the notation etc., I read the Larman book once. After that I must have read UML Distilled another 3 times!
I found that on the real test some of the diagrams were very big. After the initial shock, I calmed down and realized that they were not expecting you to fully understand every part of the diagram but just to pick out small concepts, for example aggregation or a Singleton (if every object had a more than one as a multiplicity and one class had just one, obviously that one is the Singleton).
Also, the whole test is built on one theme, so a lot of diagrams kept on repeating themselves, with just small additions.
As I said I am of average intalligence, I got 77%. I met someone who is of very high intelligence who got 90%! So It's doable.

So, Good Luck

ESY

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Old Post 11-25-2001 02:32 PM
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Stephen Hosking
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Thankyou ESY. Lovely post

I love the line "I am of average intelligence"!

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Old Post 11-25-2001 10:37 PM
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itgal
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Registered: Nov 2001
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 9

The answer is C & D.

c) Domain expert
d) Requirements decision maker

Like Stephen Hosking, I also got 100% for Requirements Modelling and 100% for Process.

-----------
ITGAL

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Old Post 12-04-2001 11:42 AM
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