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SZ
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Registered: Apr 2001
Location: New York
Posts: 492

Craig Larman's 3rd Edition

Craig Larman's newly published 3rd edition of Applying UML and Patterns has changed its subtitle to replace "and the Unified Process" with "and Iterative Development". This iteration of a well-established guide to 'UML design as process' proves that iterative development applies to books as well.

In between the 2nd and 3rd editions, Larman published a detailed survey of agile development methodologies titled Agile and Iterative Development: A Manager's Guide. This research has proven valuable to the 3rd edition, which has fully incorporated agile modeling. This is quickly visible by the inclusion of hand-drawn UML diagrams for the Monopoly game example, a new example that weaves its way through the book alongside the familiar point-of-sale example.

Why do hand-drawn UML diagrams work? The answer is, you have to try a collaborative session with a small group of developers and draw the diagrams on a board or a large easel pad to experience first hand why this is productive.

One nice suggestion for agile modelling picked up from this edition is Larman's advice to model the static (class) and dynamic (sequence) diagrams side-by-side on a whiteboard. (We've adopted large easel pads because it is easy to save the diagrams after a design session. It's surprising that Larman doesn't mention these.)

The 3rd edition, with the addition of agile methodology, is now in-step with the industry's current best-practice and puts Larman's book on a par with Robert C. Martin's Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices, another classic which combines agile development, UML and patterns. However, when it comes to explaining 'UML design as process', Larman's book is still the gold standard.

Another reason to credit Larman on this edition is that he has been very careful to cite the contributions of other object technologists. In particular, he cites the contributions of Rebecca Wirfs-Brock for Responsibility Driven Design and Scott Ambler for Agile Modeling. In fact, reading this edition you get the impression that you have been at least introduced to every major contribution to object technology made in recent years.

See the detailed OBD review of Applying UML and Patterns for a description of Larman's UML design process.

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Old Post 11-24-2004 02:27 AM
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JacobPressures
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Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Alabama
Posts: 9

I'm learning OOA/D right now. I've almost finished reading the book Sams Teach Yourself Object Oriented Programming in 21 days. It seems to be a basic foundation for Craig's book.

Since i'm very new to OOP and OOAD, I'm wondering if Larman's book will be what i need to start developing small applications. I need to know how to analyze my a problem and break it into classes. I've read the first 2 chapters of this book already and it is a bit intense. I was able to understand it only because of having already started the Sams book.

I'm tired of reading books and finding that i'm learning more and more about OOAD but don't know how to get started and get my hands dirty.

Thanks!

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Old Post 04-05-2005 07:56 PM
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SZ
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Registered: Apr 2001
Location: New York
Posts: 492

I can imagine how frustrating this must be.

However, there is no "silver bullet" when it comes to learning OO analysis and design, and then applying it to real world projects.

Actually, Craig Larman's book is as close as it gets to really showing "how to do it". We use this book extensively in our workplace to learn OO and then apply it to our daily coding.

Another suggestion would be to join an open-source project and directly participate in some aspect of development. One of the best projects, the one I would recommend, is the Spring Framework, which has an active development community and an excellent object model.

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Old Post 04-08-2005 10:15 PM
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JacobPressures
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Registered: Jun 2004
Location: Alabama
Posts: 9

Thanks very much. I will look at these. And I guess if I have any questions about the book, I'll come back and post them here.

Thanks!

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Old Post 04-13-2005 01:22 PM
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